Newsletter Vet

Canine Mast cell Tumor Panels: Fact or Fiction?

Mast cell tumors (MCT) are commonly identified tumors in dogs, comprising close to 25% of all diagnosed skin tumors.  These tumors may be seen in any age dog, but are more typically found in middle aged to older patients.  Breeds at an increased risk for developing these tumors include boxers, Boston terriers, Labrador retrievers, beagles and schnauzers.  The etiology of MCTs is largely unknown, although genetic factors and molecular alterations may play prominent roles.  Recently, there has been an increased focus on understanding these genetic and molecular alterations, including the iden

Case Study - The Value of Palliative Radiation

Darrel a 14yo MN DSH presented for a consultation at the VCC. Upon his arrival it was noted he was dyspneic by the front desk and was rushed to the treatment area.  An IV catheter was placed and flow by oxygen was given.  A pulse oximetry was taken while on flow by oxygen and was 50%.   A BP was done using a doppler and the systolic was 150mmHG. It was recommended he be taken to an emergency hospital.

Case Study - The Value of Palliative Radiation

Darrel a 14yo MN DSH presented for a consultation at the VCC. Upon his arrival it was noted he was dyspneic by the front desk and was rushed to the treatment area.  An IV catheter was placed and flow by oxygen was given.  A pulse oximetry was taken while on flow by oxygen and was 50%.   A BP was done using a doppler and the systolic was 150mmHG. It was recommended he be taken to an emergency hospital.

Cytology Case Report - Cyto

A 13-year-old spayed female Beagle presented to a medical oncologist for a lingual mass. On physical exam, there was a 1 cm, slightly lobular, slightly ulcerated mass found in the middle of the tongue surface. The mass bled upon fine needle aspirate. The patient also had a history of an adrenal mass, a retroperitoneal mass, unspecified liver changes on an abdominal ultrasound, and possible Cushing’s disease. No evidence of metastatic disease was found upon chest radiographs.

Personalized Medicine for Pets

These days, if you read any news article about human health, the words “personalized medicine” likely appear somewhere in the story.

What is personalized medicine? Is it really that revolutionary? How can personalized medicine be useful to veterinary medicine?

Multilobular Osteochondrosarcoma in a dog

"Scooby" was a 10 year old male castrated labrador retriever who presented to the Oncology service at Hope Veterinary Specialists for a large firm mass arising from the left side of his face.  Initial aspirates of the mass obtained at the referring hospital were suggestive of osteosarcoma.

Case Report: Malignant neoplasia of the brain treated with CyberKnife radiation therapy

Penny, a 5.5 year old female spayed Boxer, initially presented to her primary care veterinarian for rapidly progressive circling, ataxia, behavior changes and mental dullness. Due to the severity of neurologic signs, advanced imaging (MRI) was recommended. An MRI revealed an intra-axial mass in the right prosencephalon that was heterogeneous, hyperintense on T2 weighted images, hypointense on T1 weighted mages and peripherally contrast enhancing. This mass was in the area of the rostral internal capsule and right caudate nucleus. The mass measured 1.5 x 2.4 x 3.2 cm.

Metronomic Chemotherapy: New Tactics Using Old Ammo for the War on Cancer

Conventional cancer treatment utilizes chemotherapy at the maximally tolerated dose (MTD), or the highest dose shown to be both cytotoxic and tolerable for the patient. MTD chemotherapy targets rapidly dividing cells including:  tumor cells and normal cells of the gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow1. Since MTD chemotherapy targets normal cells, a mandatory hiatus between treatments is required to allow these cells to recover and repopulate.

Radiation Therapy for Urogenital Tumors: What’s New?

Bladder, urethral and prostatic tumors are primarily a local problem in dogs and cats.  These tumors can spread to the regional lymph nodes and eventually to other organs.  However, the majority of patients die or are euthanized because of progression of their local tumor, causing progression of clinical signs and eventual obstruction of either the urethra or ureters.  Chemotherapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, (NSAIDS) have all been shown to result in tumor responses and may help control the disease for a period of time.  However, long

Canine Osteosarcoma - Jennifer McDaniel DVM (Practice Limited to Oncology)

Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common primary bone tumor of dogs. Unfortunately, it is a very common disease seen in veterinary medicine with greater than 10,000 dogs being affected every year in the United States alone.

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